The front cover of Woman's Weekly magazine, 28 July 1923. Beneath the magazine's title there is a photograph of a woman wearing a short-sleeved knitted sweater, and beneath her there is a photo of a coat hanger with a crocheted cover.
Woman’s Weekly 28 July 1923, front cover. Knitting & Crochet Guild Collection.

On 4 February 2021, join Dr Eleanor Reed for an online talk about knitting patterns in domestic magazines from the 1920s and 1930s. Sharing images from the Knitting & Crochet Guild’s incredible Collection, this talk will explore how, helped by domestic magazines, knitwear soared in popularity during the interwar decades: highlights include an Egypt-themed sweater, knitwear from Hollywood, and a fabulous skating outfit!

 

This talk is free: you can book your place here.

 

Following the talk, there will be an opportunity to experiment with stitch patterns from some of the garments discussed. Ellie will explain more, and share a social media hashtag for those who would like to share their experiments online!

 

To participate after the event, please download a pattern booklet. Patterns are not given in full: this is because, as items in the Knitting & Crochet Guild’s Collection, they are available only to Guild members (click here to find out how to join).

 

Ellie’s talk is the first in a series of six events held alongside Making Modern Women: Women’s Magazines in Interwar Britain – an online exhibition developed by ‘Time and Tide: Connections and Legacies’ and The Women’s Library at the London School of Economics. Further information about this exhibition will be available on this website soon. For more information about the events, please click on the following links:

 

9 February 2021, 6.30-7.30pm – Urania, Esther Roper and Eva Gore-Both (Jenny White)

 

2 March 2021, 4-5pm – Murder Most Unladylike (Robin Stevens)

 

10 March 2021, 6.30-7.30pm – Women in Media Today (Samira Ahmed)

 

18 March 2021, 6.30-7.30pm – Writing Dear Mrs Bird (A. J. Pearce)

 

25 March 2021, 4-5pm – Interwar Radio Programmes for Women: the challenges of being a ‘periodical’ on the air (Dr Kate Murphy)